Brujería Reclaimed

Brujería Reclaimed

Illustrated by Vivian Rosas

Illustrated by Vivian Rosas

Brujería, witchcraft in Spanish, has a complicated position in history. Often portrayed as evil, it is now understood that negative depictions of brujería can be credited to colonizing Catholics, devaluing the culture of those they were overpowering. For many indigenous, afro, latinx women, bruja culture has become an expression of power reclamation and a form of spiritual activism that allows for an opportunity to commune with a rich history of strong female spiritual healers.

"We have always been here. Long before the Middle Passage, we were healers and midwives and community leaders. We used what the earth gave us and followed the guidance of our Ancestors to make our communities whole; healed; powerful. We learned to adapt our healing herbs on stolen land; our Indigenous family taught us. We hid Yemaja in Mother Mary and shrouded communion with our ancestors in dance and song. The drum always guided our praise. We are many in the diaspora and we have not allowed our magick to be eradicated. From Mexico to Brazil, thru Canada and the U.S., in Jamaica and thru to Haiti, we have survived. Our magick is our resistance. Our magick is our reclamation of power. Our magick is our communion with the Ancestors. No longer hidden, no longer shrouded. We aren't the grandchildren of the witches they forgot to burn; our grandmothers never let it happen." - Cassandra


An Interview with Noëlle Santos

An Interview with Noëlle Santos

An Interview with Jennifer Cunningham

An Interview with Jennifer Cunningham